For the past 11 years I have asked the question, ‘How on earth do we solve this problem, of alienation?’

I was never able to find the answer until now.

The answer of course is the children themselves.

When children are old enough to start to wonder, to question why one of their parents/grandparents disappeared, is the time when they will find the answers.

The young people who have spent many years being apart from a parent/grandparent, have never understood exactly what happened, and actually it is not their place to try and answer that question, when they should just be being children.

As they reach adulthood, that is very different.

When they begin to find their own way in the world, find themselves jobs, perhaps move away to college or university they want to know about their family, they are curious.

We have a whole generation of young people growing up with several different Dads/Mums/ Step brothers and sisters/ Grandparents/Aunts/Uncles/Cousins and their own peer group are in the same situation as they are.

As they confide in those around them they will see that they are not alone, some may well have managed to reconnect with missing family and possibly encourage others to try and do the same.

Young people may well have been told terrible lies about estranged family members and it takes enormous amounts of courage to take that first step. The fear that they might be rejected will be a real concern for them.

Which is why, we must never close that door, we must be ready to allow them to walk through and to show them they were never forgotten, they were always loved and they were always in our hearts.

I feel sure that this generation are the ‘children of the revolution,’ and they will make sure that they never behave the way others have who have gone before them.

So the time has come for this generation to shout loud to let their voices be heard.

What we must do, is to listen.

Jane