A comment made recently is something that needs to be debated.

“I have a right to see my grandchild.”

Do you?

I am not talking about the law, I am talking about the moral question.

I would be very interested to hear what you think.

Personally, No I don’t think we have a right to see our grandchildren, the minute we start to use language like this it becomes confrontational.

No-one has a right to see anyone, if our children or in-laws make a decision that we can’t be involved in our ¬†grandchildren’s lives it is just that, their decision.

Perhaps if we turn the whole subject around, with our own children did we make the decision of who they could or could not see?

I suspect your answer, is “Yes.”

Of course it is easy if we are talking about friends ect, it becomes so much more difficult when we are talking about family members, that takes as back to the beginning of do we have a right to see our grandchildren?

I can hear your responses, it is meant to be contentious.

Those of you who know me, know that I hate the word ,’right’ unfortunately there is not another word to cover the meaning, the nearest is ‘responsibility.’

It is the children that we must focus on, not us.

It IS the right of children to have a relationship with their grandparents if they wish to, unless it is proven unsafe for them to do so.

Grandparents are the link to their identity, family history warts and all.

But to say, “I have a right to see my grandchild,” is something I feel uncomfortable about.

We spend a great deal of time raising public awareness on the issues surrounding estrangement but comments like that do grandparents, as a whole, no favours at all.

Months,  have been spent talking to people who can bring this to the public eye, and yet comments such as I have mentioned, put the whole cause back years.

Jane