Today Radio 2 starts a week long focus on loneliness and isolation.

There are numerous reasons why we can feel this way, and there are several personal stories on the website, including the slot I did. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p057qtws

We all know that when we are estranged from our grandchildren it can be a very lonely isolating place, no-one seems to understand, people say unhelpful things such as, ‘you must have done something,’ they just don’t get it.

I am sure we could write a very long list of the things people say.

Without exception the first thing grandparents say when they call us is, “Thank goodness, I am not alone.”

Sadly estrangement/alienation is at epidemic proportions, although the last research I found 10 years ago, was that over one million children are denied contact in the UK, I suspect that number has risen greatly.

The isolation you feel is unbearable, you blame yourself, others blame you, you should have made things better.

The truth is you can’t.

For whatever reason there are those who are hell-bent on cutting themselves off from their family and that includes cutting grandparents out of the grandchildren’s lives.

We have to somehow work our way through the grief, that can only be achieved if we focus on other things.

Of course we can’t always do that and we have to acknowledge that some days will be better than others, and to go with the bad days allowing that grieving process. In the knowledge that these feelings will pass in time, not that we ever forget our precious people they are still in our hearts.

Getting together with one another with empathy and care is always positive.

We can gain strength from one another, and to lean on or support others.

For me that is the best therapy, and I owe it to my granddaughter to carry on, to help those who are feeling alone.

As long as BGSG exists no-one has to ever feel alone.

Jane